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Composite Fillings

A composite (tooth colored) filling is used to repair a tooth that is affected by decay, cracks, fractures, etc.  The decayed or affected portion of the tooth will be removed and then filled with a composite filling.

There are many types of filling materials available, each with their own advantages and disadvantages.  Composite fillings, along with silver amalgam fillings, are the most widely used today.  Because composite fillings are tooth colored, they can be closely matched to the color of existing teeth, and are more aesthetically suited for use in front teeth or the more visible areas of the teeth.

Composite fillings are a suitable treatment option however they are not very strong and in most cases their life span iis about two to five years.

Direct composite fillings are indicated only when the fillings required are small and the tooth still has most of its natural structure intact. When a tooth requires a large restoration composite fillings are not the best restorative option.  

Reasons for composite fillings:

  • Chipped teeth.
  • Closing space between two teeth.
  • Cracked or broken teeth.
  • Decayed teeth.
  • Worn teeth.
How are composite fillings placed?
 
Composite fillings are usually placed in one appointment.  While the tooth is numb, decay is removed as necessary.  The composite filling will then be precisely placed, shaped, and polished, restoring your tooth to its original shape and function.

It is normal to experience sensitivity to hot and cold when composite fillings are first placed; in most cases  this will subside shortly after your tooth acclimates to the new filling. In some cases the sensitivity persists for a much longer period of time. If the sensitivity becomes severe, a root canal treatment may become necessary.   

You will be given care instructions at the conclusion of your treatment.  Good oral hygiene practices, eating habits, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new fillings.